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Peru

Yearbook 1996

Peru. In late 1996, the members of the Tupac Amaru Movement (MRTA) arrested were punished by a military court in early 1996. According to Countryaah.com, four of them were sentenced to life imprisonment for planning to occupy the congress building and take congressmen hostage. One of the four was 26-year-old American citizen Lori Helene Berenson. From the US Department of Foreign Affairs, they questioned whether she would receive a fair trial, and so did several human rights organizations. Later in the year, Congress passed a law that made it possible to review cases where people could have been wrongly convicted under the stringent anti-terrorism laws.

1996 Peru

After the military was accused on several occasions of having its own financial interests in the drug trade, in January the responsibility for the fight against drugs was transferred to the police. The fight intensified when President Fujimori in April declared a state of emergency in the coca-producing areas.

In February, Congress passed a law on the sale of state oil companies. The law was fully in line with President Fujimori's privatization program, which aims to reduce the public sector deficit. In April, Prime Minister Córdova resigned, who did not accept the measures planned to reduce the country's trade deficit. A new government was formed under the leadership of Alberto Pandolfi.

In March, the Andean Group, with Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Venezuela and Colombia as members, was transformed into the Andean Community (Comunidad Andina), which is tasked with strengthening regional integration.

In connection with the celebration of the Japanese emperor's birthday in Lima in December, the Japanese embassy was occupied by some 20 members of the Tupac Amaru guerrilla. Their hostage initially amounted to several hundred prominent guests.

As the year drew to a close, 103 people were still held captive, and the guerrilla's demand to have 400 of their imprisoned followers released remained unchanged.

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