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India

Yearbook 1996

1996 IndiaIndia. According to Countryaah.com, the country's biggest corruption scandal was revealed just before the spring parliamentary elections. An investigation by the federal police CBI suggested that the businessman Surinder Jain would have paid around SEK 120 million. to hundreds of top politicians and high officials in exchange for all kinds of favors. The scandal included all major parties except the Communists and led to a number of resignations. The worst was the ruling Congress party (All India Congress Committee, I), and seven ministers left the government. The scandal greatly contributed to the Congress party in the April-May parliamentary elections doing their worst result ever and losing power. The largest individual party became the Hindu Nationalist Indian People's Party (Bharatiya Janata Party, BJP), and although it was impossible to get the support of a majority, its leader Atal Bihari Vajpayee was appointed prime minister. He resigned after less than two weeks rather than losing a vote of no confidence. The government mission now went to the center - left coalition United Front (United Front) and HD Prime Minister Deve Gowda was appointed Prime Minister. The front included 15 parties, several with purely regional roots. Nine of them were represented in the government, including for the first time a Communist Party. The majority of the front was secured by the Congress Party promising its support. The government promised investments in health care, education and poverty reduction. But the first budget also included large reductions in government spending and frozen wages in the public sector, which immediately caused tensions within the coalition. The majority of the front was secured by the Congress Party promising its support. The government promised investments in health care, education and poverty reduction. But the first budget also included large reductions in government spending and frozen wages in the public sector, which immediately caused tensions within the coalition. The majority of the front was secured by the Congress Party promising its support. The government promised investments in health care, education and poverty reduction. But the first budget also included large reductions in government spending and frozen wages in the public sector, which immediately caused tensions within the coalition.

Former Prime Minister Narasimha Rao was also forced to step down as leader of the Congress party when he was faced with three separate charges during the fall. He was suspected of having tricked a businessman of more than half a million in consultation with a Hindu guru. 1983, for having falsified a document in 1989 with the intention of throwing away the then opposition leader VP Singh and for bribing the leader of a regional party to vote against a declaration of confidence in the parliament in 1993. supporters to unite the party again.

On the national level, the non-religious parties had managed to work together to exclude the BJP from power, but in the largest state of Uttar Pradesh, the agreement was not enough. No one could form a government after this fall's local parliamentary elections, and the state was put under direct government by New Delhi for six months.

The troubled Jammu and Kashmir during the year went towards some normalization. The civilian population was tired of six years of Muslim uprising, and the armed movements became increasingly fragmented. The government had contacts with defunct separatist leaders and was able to hold elections for a local parliament in the fall for the first time since 1987. The old ruling party National Conference won big, and its leader Farooq Abdullah resigned as head of government.

1996 India

For the fourth time in a row, representatives of the Dow Chemical Company and its subsidiary Union Carbide Corporation did not appear in July from a Bhopal hearing in which they were charged with the 1984 poisoning.

In April 2016, a Manipur police officer said that in 2002-09 he had participated in over 100 executions. During a July case involving over 1,500 executions, the Supreme Court issued a ruling that "police officers could not always expect full impunity in civil courts" and that the charges of execution had to be investigated.

In October 2016, India hosted the BRICS Summit with the participation of Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa. The same month, the country ratified the COP 21 agreement reached in Paris December 2015 on the reduction of CO 2 emissions.

Authorities continued to use the Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act (FCRA), which restricts Indian organizations' access to foreign aid to harass Indian NGOs. In October 2016, the authorities refused to give FCRA licenses to 25 NGOs without justification. In December, it stripped the licenses of a further 7 NGOs, including Greenpeace India. Media cited government officials for stating that these NGOs had acted against "the interests of the nation". In August, Karnataka police raided a case of treason against Amnesty International India for allegedly conducting an «anti-national» human rights event in Kashmir.

One of the Modi government's first decisions in May 2014 was to investigate "black money". After 2½ years of investigation in November 2016, the government decided to abolish the 500 and 1000 Rupi banknotes. The decision sparked widespread protests across the country and long queues in front of the banks for weeks where people should have exchanged their big notes.

India and the US strengthened their cooperation in 2016, especially around security.

BJP politician Ram Nath Kovind won the presidential election in July 2017 with 65.7% of the vote. His counter candidate Meira Kumar got 34.4%. The election was conducted by a college of electors from all the states of India.

In August 2017, the Supreme Court recognized talaq for being in violation of the Constitution. Until then, Muslim men had been able to say "I want to divorce you" (talaq) 3 times, and then they were divorced. The ruling was a step forward for Muslim women, but was also seen as the Hindu fundamentalists' struggle against the country's minority.

An October 2017 global study found that Delhi was the world's fourth most dangerous city for women and when it came to the risks of rape, sexual violence and harassment it was the world's most dangerous.

Every few days, three journalists were killed in traffic in March 2018. Sandeep Sharma was killed in Madhya Pradesh and Navin Nischal as well as Vijay Singh were killed in Bihar. A surveillance camera subsequently showed how Sharma had been deliberately driven down and killed by an accelerating truck. He had revealed how a senior cop received 25,000 Rupees monthly to allow the extraction of sand from an otherwise protected natural area. Sand is an important building material (in concrete) and since 2000 a whole mafia has been developed around the extraction of it from protected areas. Nischal and Singh were killed by a former mayor who demanded that journalists write favorably about him. The CPJ Committee documented in a 2017 report that 27 Indian journalists had been killed since 1992, without the killers being convicted.

 

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